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Garden design in January- Yin and Yang






A garden can still look good in January and the leaf colour and texture of evergreens mixed with deciduous shrubs can have its own beauty. But I have been thinking that it is not just the aesthetics of January that is relevant in this month, but our whole attuned towards nature. 


This got me thinking about Yin and Yang.


Most simply, the theory of Yin and Yang describes a world being made up not of opposite and opposing forces, but an experience in life where events and things are actually connected, sometimes complimentary and more often interdependent. So Winter is not the opposite of Summer but they are two sides of the same coin that transform into each other and rely on each other. One is not bad and the other good, but that they are two experiences that we can bring ourselves into alignment with.

 

If Life and Death are lovers, January is their secret rendezvous.

 

Originally from Australia my first Winter in England was overwhelming. I saw everything dying around me and the light was shrinking each day. When I saw my first cherry blossom in the Spring I felt reborn! So, I realised, things die back in the Winter so that they will survive and be stronger for the next Summer.

 

The decay we see in our gardens are forming the compost and rich soil for next year’s plant needs and the beds becoming fertile for the dormant seeds of Nigella, Nasturtiums and Marigolds. The cold season brings about the deaths of some plants that have had their time and new plants will grow into the space left behind. Plants that have lost their leaves have drawn inside themselves for protection and to conserve water before any possible freezes. The vibrant sap that plants and trees have been building up all Summer has fully descended into their roots. (Indeed the only sap left in the trunk and branches of trees is higher in sugar content forming a kind of anti-freeze as the sugar syrup has a lower freezing point than water.)

 

We often want to tidy up our gardens in January but just like order and disorder were seen as interdependent in ancient China, one leading to the other and back again, so to we can see mess and cleanliness in that way. The chaos of leaves, windfalls and storm scattered twigs are vital homes to the bumblebee, woodlice and hibernating hedgehogs. It is not until Spring sounds its trumpets that we need to get rid of the old to help bring in the new.

 

One quality of Yin is stillness. We can enter our garden and be affected by the quietness of life. The world spins more slowly on its axis and so can we as we move about. All our Yang efforts over Summer, the endless stimulation of the internet and TV, can fall away and we can be awash with the silvers and blacks and deep wet browns of a garden no longer full of restless and reproductive energy. It can be a time of contemplation where we can concentrate on where we have got to in our lives and relationships, what we achieved last year and for a minute let go of future hopes and plans. It can be a time of loneliness and, if we can allow ourselves to feel this most difficult of emotions, from this place a deepening can come, giving us a clearer understanding of what we need. A fallow feeling that tells us what is most precious.

 

We can enjoy the skeleton of branches that reveal the growth history of the trees and the windy forces that bent them and the sunlight that seduced them in particular directions. The seed heads of perennials, hanging like small empty purses, robbed of their seeds by birds and squirrels and the frosts that enliven the patterns of leaves and greenhouse windows. most of nature had gone downward. Summer’s wonderful electric expansion is a dim memory, seen in a few frozen grapes on a vine.

 

We can prepare for Spring gently, pruning fruit trees, roses, grapes, figs and wisteria knowing, as we cut off Summer’s excited growth back to fat fruiting spurs, that these places will be exactly where the plant will squeeze it’s juices and form its fruits in the year ahead.

 

And then the very first daffodil, or a burst of yellow from the spidery flowers of Witchhazel or bright Aconites in the woodland part of our garden. Even in the Yin there is Yang. Pink Cyclamen grow proud amongst the dry old roots of a Yew tree.

 

Janus, the Roman God of Transitions and Doorways, often thought of as the origin of the word January, is a two headed deity, looking to the past and also to the future. The world is momentarily suspended, Yin and Yang is in balance, they become indivisible, our garden becomes the theatre for this ancient stillpoint.

 

What to do this January in your garden

 

The biggest jobs are the pruning of deciduous plants like Roses, Wysteria and fruit trees.

 

The best place to go to learn proper pruning methods is a professional gardener, the RHS Pruning Manuel or Youtube !

 

Example- If you type in “Pruning a small apple tree” you will get all sorts of well meaning gardeners showing you what they do. Choose to listen to an expert though there are different options. Try RHS first.  Also make sure the apple tree looks like your one as there are different types.

 

Also in January you can sow in your greenhouse all sorts of vegetables ready to be transplanted in Spring into your plot.

 

Plus you can start to force your Rhubarb by placing as big a pot as you can find over the heads.

 

Where to visit this January

 

 

If you want to walk off those extra Xmas calories you can take a trip up to Kew Gardens. They have such a huge range of trees even in the middle of winter there is so much to see. Plus you can hang out in the cafes or Tropical Greenhouse for a warm break. They also have after-dark tours. Or visit a local forest!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Structure in Garden Design

A good garden design needs good bones.

Your garden has to look good even on a grey rainy day in Winter.

If you achieve this with structure such as flint walls, hedges, pergolas and paths then when Summer comes and everything explodes in lush greens and vivid colours the structure will support and frame the beauty that you have created.

Here are some images of structure in nature I have seen over the last month which no doubt is already informing me as I design.

Here is the great Montezuma pine at Sheffield Park, the skirt of new growth at the base of an ancient Sweet Chestnut, Rhododendron branches next to a lake, Halloween pumpkins still in a field, Yew topiary and the seeds of the wonderful Handkerchief tree.

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Front Garden Design

The whole front garden was just shingle onto of old brick and concrete. The worse the garden the better for me as the transformation is that much more delightful.

My clients wanted a front garden design that would compliment and enhance the front of their newly renovated house. They still wanted an area to drive into the property to park and they wanted the bed to be very low maintenance.

I separated the drive area from the garden with a mixed evergreen hedge and a bespoke black metal arch to match the curve of the arch over the doorway and the metal trim pattern on the house.

A Cretian water pot bubbles away as they have their breakfast in the sunny morning space to the left of the front of the house.

Using shingle, 20mm white york, allows them to access the plants effortlessly, keep the weeds down to a bare minimum and allow a feeling of space and light in the front. 

I choose Cercis, Japanese Acer and Amelanchier lemarkii for the feature trees as they will hold their shape and not create any dense shade.

We used Euonymous Green Rocket to line the front path to avoid disease prone Buxus. Plus it has a dynamic upward growth habit which definitely adds to the front.

Draft plan.
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Stunning rose

Sorry for the short blog but I just had to show you this picture of a rose I took in Salisbury last week! Natural light is falling into the already lighter colour of the rose just as a bee dives in.

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Design refurbishment

Even a well designed garden can become tired and frayed at the edges as plants get leggy or do better than expected in a particular spot.

We replanted the beds, shaped and sculptured 5 large Pittisporum trees and tried to link the magnificent Magnolia that stands in the middle of the lawn with the rest of the garden by planting the 2 Pittisporum ball shaped plants- Pittisporum Tom Thumb and Pittisporum Golf Ball.

These plants will become beautifully round and look as if a giant has scattered its marbles on the lawn.
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